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Rosie’s Pest Control

2435 Whitten Road, Memphis TN 38133

Phone: (901) 567-3800

Do Bugs Hibernate In The Winter

Yes! Insects Winter in a Variety of Ways

In general, insects can make it through winter’s cold temperatures the best when the temperatures are stable, not changing drastically through thawing and re-freezing. Many insects will seek shelter and nourishment through the winter in a mixed variety of tiny-habitats. Some of these tiny bug homes are under the dirt, inside the wood of fallen logs and trees, and even in outgrowths of plants. A certain kind of fly is known by fishermen to be present in certain galls in winter, and the fly larvae are smartly used to bait fish.  Layers of snow are very beneficial to insects because snow insulates the soil and turf and keeps the temperature surprisingly consistent. Honeybees have been found to remain partially active in hollow trees through the generation of bee  body heat. They can consume up to 30 pounds of accumulated honey over the winter months which makes this feasible. This heat energy is made by the oxidation of honey, and moved freely in the hive by the wing fanning of worker bees. Insects that are inactive during the winter months undergo a state in which their development, maturation and actions are temporarily delayed, with a rate of metabolism that is elevated enough to make sure they stay alive. This dormant situation is called diapause. In contrast, when vertebrates go through hibernation,  they have minor activity and actually add tissues to their bodies.

Bugs in Memphis May Not Have a Layer of Snow to Hibernate In.

In Memphis, insects may not get a layer of snow to help them stay warm throughout the winter. Insects will seek shelter where they can find it, even inside your home.  Rosie’s Pest Control will provide you with a free inspection for your peace of mind.

By | 2017-08-20T23:37:02+00:00 January 25th, 2017|Mosquitoes, Rosie's Pest Control, Termites|0 Comments

Affulent Homes, Do They Have Less Pest Problems?

Bigger Homes Do Have More Bugs!

In a survey of indoor arthropods, the most common house spider (arthropods) was a common and repeat tenant. Now, the scientists report that wealthier areas have a wider variety of arthropods.

In wealthy neighborhoods, the houses have a varied palate … of spiders and flies. The interiors of these homes are populated by a more diverse array of arthropods than those in less prosperous neighborhoods, a new study indicates.

The explanation for this abundance actually lies in the exterior of the home. Typically, nicer neighborhoods are also richer in species. Scientists have discovered this “luxury effect” before, in plants and outdoor animals such as lizards, bats and birds. For plants, the connection is very direct; affluent tenants have more funds to direct to landscaping, or live in lusher communities. In turn, a diverse collection of plants offers more food and habitats for animals.

Previously, the team explored 50 houses in and around Raleigh, North Carolina, and determined that more than 100 arthropod species dwell within the average home (most of these tiny occupants aren’t pests). Using data from this “arthropods of the great indoors” survey, the scientists have now investigated how landscaping and socioeconomic status can affect indoor bug diversity.

“There is a general perception that homes in poorer neighborhoods are refuge to more indoor arthropods,” the team wrote August 2 in Biology Letters. Their work indicates that this perception is off-base.

Most arthropods that show up inside are actually outdoor species that made their way in by accident. The majority of indoor arthropods were flies, spiders, beetles and ants, although the scientists also unearthed some more human-dependent critters such as dust mites. Houses in neighborhoods with an average annual income of about $33,000 had denizens from about 74 arthropod families. In neighborhoods with an average yearly income of about $176,000, a given house was likely to carry arthropods from 105 families.

The entomologists expected to find more types of arthropods in big houses with more surrounding plant cover and diversity. But in affluent neighborhoods, even houses with sparse vegetation carried a wide variety of arthropod families; simply being near other, more verdant homes gave them a boost.

Though intriguing, the survey doesn’t represent bug diversity everywhere; the scientists only sampled freestanding houses in one city. But it does show how connected the interiors of our homes are to the world outside. “The management of neighborhoods and cities can have effects on biodiversity that can extend from trees and birds all the way to the arthropod life in bedrooms and basements,” the team concluded.

If worries about insects living inside your home have you down, contact Rosie’s Pest Control for a free evaluation of your needs.