Schedule A Service Call
Request A Home Inspection
Request A Price Estimate

Rosie’s Pest Control

2435 Whitten Road, Memphis TN 38133

Phone: (901) 567-3800

Blog

/Blog/

Do Bugs Hibernate In The Winter

Yes! Insects Winter in a Variety of Ways

In general, insects can make it through winter’s cold temperatures the best when the temperatures are stable, not changing drastically through thawing and re-freezing. Many insects will seek shelter and nourishment through the winter in a mixed variety of tiny-habitats. Some of these tiny bug homes are under the dirt, inside the wood of fallen logs and trees, and even in outgrowths of plants. A certain kind of fly is known by fishermen to be present in certain galls in winter, and the fly larvae are smartly used to bait fish.  Layers of snow are very beneficial to insects because snow insulates the soil and turf and keeps the temperature surprisingly consistent. Honeybees have been found to remain partially active in hollow trees through the generation of bee  body heat. They can consume up to 30 pounds of accumulated honey over the winter months which makes this feasible. This heat energy is made by the oxidation of honey, and moved freely in the hive by the wing fanning of worker bees. Insects that are inactive during the winter months undergo a state in which their development, maturation and actions are temporarily delayed, with a rate of metabolism that is elevated enough to make sure they stay alive. This dormant situation is called diapause. In contrast, when vertebrates go through hibernation,  they have minor activity and actually add tissues to their bodies.

Bugs in Memphis May Not Have a Layer of Snow to Hibernate In.

In Memphis, insects may not get a layer of snow to help them stay warm throughout the winter. Insects will seek shelter where they can find it, even inside your home.  Rosie’s Pest Control will provide you with a free inspection for your peace of mind.

By | 2017-08-20T23:37:02+00:00 January 25th, 2017|Mosquitoes, Rosie's Pest Control, Termites|0 Comments

Affulent Homes, Do They Have Less Pest Problems?

Bigger Homes Do Have More Bugs!

In a survey of indoor arthropods, the most common house spider (arthropods) was a common and repeat tenant. Now, the scientists report that wealthier areas have a wider variety of arthropods.

In wealthy neighborhoods, the houses have a varied palate … of spiders and flies. The interiors of these homes are populated by a more diverse array of arthropods than those in less prosperous neighborhoods, a new study indicates.

The explanation for this abundance actually lies in the exterior of the home. Typically, nicer neighborhoods are also richer in species. Scientists have discovered this “luxury effect” before, in plants and outdoor animals such as lizards, bats and birds. For plants, the connection is very direct; affluent tenants have more funds to direct to landscaping, or live in lusher communities. In turn, a diverse collection of plants offers more food and habitats for animals.

Previously, the team explored 50 houses in and around Raleigh, North Carolina, and determined that more than 100 arthropod species dwell within the average home (most of these tiny occupants aren’t pests). Using data from this “arthropods of the great indoors” survey, the scientists have now investigated how landscaping and socioeconomic status can affect indoor bug diversity.

“There is a general perception that homes in poorer neighborhoods are refuge to more indoor arthropods,” the team wrote August 2 in Biology Letters. Their work indicates that this perception is off-base.

Most arthropods that show up inside are actually outdoor species that made their way in by accident. The majority of indoor arthropods were flies, spiders, beetles and ants, although the scientists also unearthed some more human-dependent critters such as dust mites. Houses in neighborhoods with an average annual income of about $33,000 had denizens from about 74 arthropod families. In neighborhoods with an average yearly income of about $176,000, a given house was likely to carry arthropods from 105 families.

The entomologists expected to find more types of arthropods in big houses with more surrounding plant cover and diversity. But in affluent neighborhoods, even houses with sparse vegetation carried a wide variety of arthropod families; simply being near other, more verdant homes gave them a boost.

Though intriguing, the survey doesn’t represent bug diversity everywhere; the scientists only sampled freestanding houses in one city. But it does show how connected the interiors of our homes are to the world outside. “The management of neighborhoods and cities can have effects on biodiversity that can extend from trees and birds all the way to the arthropod life in bedrooms and basements,” the team concluded.

If worries about insects living inside your home have you down, contact Rosie’s Pest Control for a free evaluation of your needs.

Common Christmas Tree Pests

While a lot of trees carry microscopic insects, most of them are harmless.  Some Saw flies may hatch from their cocoons when they get moved inside.  Saw Flies have a short lifespan so this is not too much of a threat.  Preying mantis pests can also hatch out in large numbers.  Bark Beetles can be embedded in the trunk of the tree as well.  Most of these pests don’t pose much of a risk, just a nuisance.  Vacuum up these critters and their cocoons when visible.

Happy Holidays from Rosie’s Pest Control!

Protect The Bees

Bees are dying off at an unprecedented rate. Some report that our country is losing 30% of it’s hives each year.

At first, no one knew why.  In the last few years scientists have complied compelling evidence that points to a class of insecticides called neonicotinoids. These chemicals are widely used in commercial agriculture but can have lethal effects on bees. Some other farming pesticides are also adding to the toll. So are invasive parasites and an overall decline in the quality of bees’ diets.

It’s clear that the combination of factors poses a pretty serious problem for anyone who likes to eat, since bees—both the domesticated kind and their wild bumblebee cousins, both of which are in decline—are the main pollinators of most major fruit and nut crops. The problem is so severe that this spring President Obama released the first-ever national strategy for protecting the health and life of bees and other key pollinators.

Rosie’s Pest Control  is committed to doing our part to help save the bees. When we get a call about an annoying and threatening bee colony, we take every effort to relocate the bee hive. We have been working with David Glover from the Bartlett Bee Whisperer to save this vital species.

Memphis Ranks #1 For Roof Rats

Fall is the most common season for roof rats due to their outdoor food source being reduced.  Even when our region is experiencing warmer than normal temperatures, natural food sources are drying up.  Memphis is ranked number 1 for infestations from this invasive species.

They are much easier to distinguish from some of their rodent relatives because of their long and scaly tails.

According to Andy Long, director of Rosie’s Pest Control, roof rats usually stay out of plain sight but even one spotted is very often times a sign of a serious infestation.

Long also said they are usually active at night and often leave smudge marks as result of dirt and oil.  You can also find evidence in droppings around active areas.

Roof rats may enter buildings  and structures via holes, soffit vents, cables entering buildings and turbine and box vents on roofs.  Inspections by a professional can help identify these entry points so needed repairs and preventative maintenance can be done.  Contact Andy Long or Katie Fox with Rosie’s to get your free home or business inspection before the weather gets any cooler.

Protect Your Home From Roof Rats

Tips to keep roof rats away

1. Starve them out

• Citrus, figs, acorns, and various other locally grown plants are a source of food and water for roof rats. Pick fruit, even if it’s not ripe, and pick up any that falls to the ground.

• Don’t leave pet food out overnight, and pick up dog feces.

• Limit use of bird feeders. Either stop filling them altogether or only provide the amount birds will eat in a day. Sweep up any spilled food before sunset. Store bird seed in sealed, rat-proof containers.

• Indoors, store bulk food in sealed, rat-proof containers.

• Keep garbage containers tightly covered.

2. Clean up your yard

• Rake under trees and shrubs.

• Prune fruit trees so the ground under them is visible.

• Remove wood and brush piles. If you have to store wood and lumber, keep it at least 18 inches above the ground and 12 inches from walls.

• Trim or remove dead trees. Roof rats nest in the skirts of old palm fronds, in piles of debris and in hollow trees.

• Thin out bushes so you can see daylight through them. Roof rats like to nest in oleanders in the summer.

3. Seal your home

• Roof rats can enter through openings as small as a nickel, so be diligent sealing cracks and crevices. Use stucco diamond mesh, which is available at building material suppliers, to seal holes and vents. It is easy to cut and mold, but for rats it’s like chewing razor blades.

• Check for holes in exterior walls and near water heaters, washers, dryers, dishwashers and under sinks.

•  Caulk cracks, screen the sewer stacks on the roof and stuff air-conditioning lines that run from outside into the attic with steel wool or copper mesh to prevent rats from entering.

4. Be strategic with traps

• Set traps baited with a little peanut butter in areas such as the laundry room or garden shed.

• Place traps away from places they can be found by pets or small children.

•  Roof rats can be skittish about unfamiliar objects, so leave the traps in place for at least a week before moving them.

5. Be careful with poisons

• Bait stations are protected places for rats to feed without being accessible to non-target animals.  Call Rosie’s Pest Control to set you up with these bait stations. They are professionals and will know the best places to put these stations for maximum effectiveness.

• Don’t wire poison bait blocks directly to tree branches. That could lead to accidental poisoning of cats and birds.

• Make sure your home is sealed before putting out poison bait so the rats don’t enter the house and die, creating a stench it might be hard to get rid of.

Katie & Andy Setting Off To Kill Mosquitoes

Meet Katie and Andy!  They sometimes work in tandem, sometimes go it alone to cover more ground. Ants. mice, spiders, roaches, fleas and mosquitoes are some of the most common pests that residents of the Memphis area combat.  Rosie’s can help eliminate all of these and termites too! Need a free evaluation of your pest problems?  Click here!

Interesting Bug Facts

Bug facts:

  • While gathering food, a bee may fly up to 60 miles in one day.
  • Termites eat through wood two times faster when listening to rock music.
  • Houseflies can taste with their feet — they have taste buds on them.
  • It takes about one hundred Monarch Butterflies to weigh an ounce.
  • The queen of a certain termite species can lay 40,000 eggs per day.
  • To survive the cold of winter months, many insects replace their body water with a chemical called glycerol, which acts as an antifreeze against the temperatures.
  • For every human there are about 1 million ants.
  • Mosquitoes have killed more humans than all the wars in history.
  • A house fly lives for only 14 days.
  • You are more likely to be killed by a Champagne cork than by a poisonous spider.
  • Bed bugs can live for several months without a blood meal. This means they can linger in furniture for a long time until they are near a human host again.
  • All insects on Earth would outweigh all animals if put on a scale.

Tips For Pest Free Summer BBQ

Now is the the perfect time of year for barbeques, picnics, and tailgate parties. Attracted by the smell of delicious food and drinks, uninvited pests are known to invade outdoor parties and send guests running. Before you start firing up the grill, consider taking some preventative measures to contain the summer pests in your area. We’ve gathered a list of tips that you can use to enjoy an insect-free setting for your next outdoor entertaining.

To Do Before the BBQ

Check screen doors, screen windows, and screen coverings for any holes or tears that could allow entry to unwanted insects and repair them.
Certain types of light bulbs will attract insects, so use low pressure and sodium vapor lights outdoors.
Many insects are attracted to fragrances, so avoid using sweet-scented items like candles and instead use candles that are scented to repel insects or use citronella oil in your outdoor torches.
Make sure your lawn is mowed short, your flower beds are weeded, and your shrubs are groomed to prevent snakes and a variety of insects from moving in.
Use a homemade garlic spray on plants, shrubs, flowers, and grassy areas to repel insects.
Create an ant-free zone by sprinkling a border of baby powder or corn starch around your picnic table. Ants won’t cross the line!
Remove any pet food or any fruit that has fallen from trees that might attract insects.
Thoroughly inspect for wasp nests under porches, patios, decks, eaves, grills, playground equipment, etc. and get rid of them.
Consider hiring a professional pest control company like Rosie’s Pest Control to come out and spray the area you plan to use for guests.

To Keep on Hand During the BBQ

Use covers on your food until just before it is time to eat in order to limit the smells that insects are drawn to.
If possible, use cups with lids or bottles with twist off caps so that sweet, sugary drinks aren’t left open to attracts wasps and flies. Or at least try to provide clear plastic cups for your guests to use as aluminum cans and open bottles that you can’t see through are good hiding spots for flying insects.
Keep your trash can near enough so that you can regularly dispose of trash, but also far enough away from guests as trash bins can attract flies and other bugs. Additionally, be sure to continuously clean up any trash, crumbs or spills from the area.
Use box fans to not only cool the area for your guests, but because flying bugs hate breezes.
Pour some red wine into a few cups and place them surrounding your gathering area to attract any lingering fruit flies and keep them away from the actual glasses of wine that your guests drink from.

Keep Rosie’s Pest Control’s number on hand. Rosie’s will wage war on your bugs and help keep your home and yard enjoyable.  901-567-3800

Meet Katie Fox, Our Newest Field Technician

Katie Fox is a great addition to the Rosie’s team. She is fully certified and is a very hard worker! Katie grew up playing soccer, a very tough and physically demanding sport, so she is not afraid of hard work and getting her hands dirty! Katie can handle mosquitoes, bed bugs, roaches, fleas, ants, spiders and so much more! We are very lucky to have Katie on board with Rosie’s Pest Control in Memphis.